Why do Australians have so many religious sects?

In the aftermath of the horrific Sydney siege, many Australians have been left confused about the meaning of the term “sect” or “sectarianism”.

A study by the Centre for Australian Studies at Monash University found that about 20 per cent of Australians believe that there are more religions than just Islam.

In Australia, there are at least 27 groups that call themselves “sects”, including many that are non-sectarian, but all of these have their own unique beliefs.

They include a Christian group called The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a Buddhist group called the Bodhisattva Buddhist Fellowship and a Jewish group called Rabbis for the Liberation of Palestine.

But while many of these groups are well-known and well-respected, there is also a growing number of “sectarians” and “sectoid” groups, which are not considered to be “sect groups” or even “sect”.

“We’ve become so used to being lumped together with all of the other religions that we don’t realise there are so many different things that are out there that have different definitions,” Dr. Matthew Green, a professor of social anthropology at Monastir University, told ABC News.

Dr Green said that he and his research team wanted to find out more about “sectularism”, a term that is often used to describe groups of people who share a shared faith and practice different practices. “

When we think of ‘sect’, we’re really thinking of these very particular groups that have particular beliefs and are organised in specific ways, and they are very much the most visible members of those groups.”

Dr Green said that he and his research team wanted to find out more about “sectularism”, a term that is often used to describe groups of people who share a shared faith and practice different practices.

The term “religious persecution” has been used in Australia since the early 1900s, when a law was passed by the federal government in 1919, which included a prohibition on any form of religious persecution.

This law was later amended by the Australian Parliament in 1976, which was designed to ensure that Australians’ right to freedom of religion was not infringed upon by the state.

While Dr Green’s study has not yet examined the origins of the phrase, he said he hoped that it would be useful to Australians in the future.

He said he found the term useful because it has the potential to be useful for people in situations where they are facing persecution because of their faith.

“[It’s] used to make people feel more confident in their own beliefs,” he said.

Dr Green also noted that while there is no universal definition of the word “sect”, the term can often be used to refer to “specific groups”.

For example, the term is often defined as a “sect of the right” that is a part of the Australian Conservative Party, a political party that is broadly opposed to multiculturalism.

A similar situation exists with “secto-cultural” groups.

If you or anyone you know is facing persecution for your faith, Dr Green suggested that you and your family should be able to make contact with a representative of the group and ask them to help you.

As a result, if you feel like your rights have been violated, you may be able make a complaint to the Australian Federal Police or the Australian Human Rights Commission.